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Fall Protection Part 3 checklist

The professional inspection solution

You can conduct this checklist for free on the Checkbuster platform. You can use a lap-top, PC or the free inspection App

Controlled-Access Zones

  • Controlled-access zones where leading edge and other operations are taking place are defined by a control line or by another means that restricts access
  • When control lines are used, they are erected at least 6 but not more than 25 feet from the unprotected or leading edge, except when precast concrete members are erected
  • When precast concrete members are erected, the distance from the control line to the leading edge is at least 6 but not more than 60 feet, or half the length of the member being erected (whichever is less)
  • The control line does extend along the entire length of the unprotected or leading edge. The control line is approximately parallel to the unprotected or leading edge
  • The control line is connected on each side to a guardrail system or wall
  • In areas where overhand bricklaying and related work are taking place, the controlled-access zone is defined by a control line erected at least 10 but not more than 15 feet from the working edge
  • In areas where overhand bricklaying and related work are taking place, the controlled-access zone does enclose all workers performing overhand bricklaying and related work at the working edge. The control line is approximately parallel to the working edge
  • In areas where overhand bricklaying and related work are taking place, additional control lines are erected at each end to enclose the controlled-access zone
  • In areas where overhand bricklaying and related work are taking place, only employees are engaged in overhand bricklaying or related work permitted in the controlled-access zone
  • Control lines do consist of ropes, wires, tapes, or equivalent materials, and supporting stanchions
  • Each control line is flagged or otherwise clearly marked at 6-foot intervals (or less) with high-visibility material
  • Each control line is rigged and supported so that its lowest point (including sag) is 39 inches (or more) from the walking/working surface, and its highest point is 45 inches (or less) from the walking/working surface
  • Each control line does have a minimum breaking strength of 200 pounds
  • On floors and roofs where guardrail systems are not in place before the beginning of overhand bricklaying operations, controlled-access zones are enlarged (as necessary) to enclose all points of access, material-handling areas, and storage areas
  • If guardrail systems on floors and roofs must be removed for overhand bricklaying work or leading edge work, only the portion of the guardrail is removed that is necessary to accomplish the day’s work

Safety-Monitoring Systems

  • A competent person has been designated to monitor the safety of other workers
  • The safety monitor does warn workers when they appear to be unaware of a fall hazard or act in an unsafe manner
  • The safety monitor is on the same walking/working surface and within sighting distance of the workers being monitored
  • The safety monitor is close enough to communicate with the workers being monitored
  • Monitoring workers is the only responsibility of the safety monitor
  • Mechanical equipment is kept away from areas where safety-monitoring systems are used to monitor employees working on low-slope roofs
  • Only employees are working on low-sloped roofs, or employees covered by a fall protection plan, allowed in an area where a safety-monitoring system is in place
  • Workers in a controlled-access zone do comply promptly with fall hazard warnings from safety monitors

Covers

  • Covers located in roadways and vehicular aisles can support (without failure) at least twice the maximum axle load of the largest vehicle expected to cross over the cover
  • All other covers are capable of supporting (without failure) at least twice the weight of workers, equipment, and materials that may be imposed on the cover at any one time
  • All covers are secured when installed to prevent displacement by the wind, equipment, or workers
  • Covers are color coded, or they are marked with the word HOLE or COVER to warn of the hazard

Protection From Falling Objects

  • When used as falling-object protection, toeboards are erected along the edge of the overhead walking/working surface for a distance sufficient to protect workers below
  • Toeboards can withstand (without failure) a force of at least 50 pounds applied in any downward or outward direction at any point along the toeboard
  • Toeboards are a minimum of 3-1/2 inches in vertical height from their top edge to the level of the walking/working surface
  • Toeboards do have 1/4 inch clearance (or less) above the walking/working surface
  • Toeboards are solid, or do they have openings 1 inch (or less) in greatest dimension
  • Where tools, equipment, or materials are piled higher than the top edge of a toeboard, paneling or screening is erected from the walking/working surface or toeboard to the top of a guardrail system’s top rail or midrail
  • When guardrail systems are used as falling-object protection, openings are small enough to prevent falling objects from passing through
  • During overhand bricklaying and related work, materials or equipment (except masonry and mortar) are stored at least 4 feet from the working edge
  • During overhand bricklaying and related work, excess mortar, broken or scattered masonry units, and all other materials and debris are kept clear from the work area by removal at regular intervals
  • During roofing work, materials and equipment are stored at least 6 feet from a roof edge, unless guardrails are erected at the edge
  • During roofing work, materials that are piled, grouped, or stacked near a roof edge are stable and self-supporting
  • When used as falling-object protection, canopies are strong enough to prevent collapse and to prevent objects from falling through

Fall Protection Plan

  • The fall protection plan was prepared by a qualified person
  • The fall protection plan is developed specifically for the site where the leading-edge work, precast concrete work, or residential construction work is being performed
  • The fall protection plan is up to date
  • A qualified person does approve all changes to the fall protection plan
  • A copy of the fall protection plan, with all approved changes, is maintained at the job site
  • A competent person does supervise the implementation of the fall protection plan
  • The fall protection plan does document why conventional fall protection systems are infeasible or why their use would create a greater hazard
  • The fall protection plan does include other written measures that will be taken to reduce or eliminate the fall hazard for workers who are not protected by the conventional fall protection systems
  • The fall protection plan does identify each location where conventional fall protection methods cannot be used
  • Locations are classified as controlled-access zones if conventional fall protection methods cannot be used
  • Where no alternative measure has been implemented, a safety-monitoring system has been implemented
  • The fall protection plan does include a statement that identifies each student or employee who is designated to work in controlled-access zones
  • If a fall or other serious incident occurs, circumstances are investigated to determine whether changes need to be implemented in the fall protection plan (e.g., new practices, procedures, or training)