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Fall Protection Part 2 checklist

The professional inspection solution

You can conduct this checklist for free on the Checkbuster platform. You can use a lap-top, PC or the free inspection App

Guardrail Systems

  • The top edge height of top rails (or equivalent guardrail system members) is 42 inches, plus or minus 3 inches above the walking or working level
  • When no wall or parapet wall is at least 21 inches high, the midrails, screens, mesh, or intermediate vertical members (or equivalent intermediate structural members) are installed between the top edge of the guardrail system and the walking or working surface
  • Midrails are installed at a height midway between the top edge of the guardrail system and the walking or working level.
  • Screens and mesh do extend from the top rail to the walking or working level and along the entire opening between top rail supports
  • When used between posts, intermediate members (such as balusters) are 19 inches apart or less
  • Other structural members (such as additional midrails and architectural panels) are installed so that openings in the guardrail system are 19 inches wide or less
  • Guardrail systems can withstand (without failure) a force of at least 200 pounds applied within 2 inches of the top edge, in any outward or downward direction, at any point along the top edge
  • When a 200 pound test load is applied in a downward direction to the top rail, the top edge of the guardrail does deflect to a height of 39 inches or more above the walking or working level
  • Midrails, screens, mesh, intermediate vertical members, solid panels, and equivalent structural members can withstand (without failure) a force of at least 150 pounds applied in any downward or outward direction at any point along the midrail or other member
  • Guardrail systems are surfaced to prevent snagging of clothing and injury from punctures or lacerations
  • It is prohibited for the ends of all top rails and midrails to overhang the terminal posts (unless overhang does not cause a hazard)
  • It is prohibited to construct top rails or midrails of steel banding and plastic banding
  • Top rails and midrails are at least one-quarter inch nominal diameter or thickness
  • If wire rope is used for top rails, it is flagged at 6-foot intervals (or less) with high-visibility material
  • When guardrail systems are used to protect hoisting areas, a chain, gate, or removable guardrail section is placed across the access opening between guardrail sections when hoisting operations are not taking place
  • When guardrail systems are used at holes, they are erected on all unprotected sides or edges of the hole
  • When guardrail systems are placed around holes, only two (or fewer) sides do have removable guardrail sections to allow the passage of materials
  • When a hole is not in use, it is closed over with a cover, or is a guardrail system provided along all unprotected sides or edges
  • Guardrail systems are equipped with a gate (or offset so that a person cannot walk directly into the hole) when they are placed around holes that are used as points of access (such as ladderways)
  • Guardrail systems are used on ramps and runways erected along each unprotected side or edge
  • Manila, plastic, or synthetic rope that is used for top rails or midrails is inspected frequently to ensure that it continues to meet the strength requirements indicated in Questions 7, 8, and 9.

Personal Fall Arrest Systems

  • The use of body belts as part of a personal fall arrest system is prohibited
  • Connectors on personal fall arrest systems are made of drop-forged, pressed, or formed steel; or of equivalent materials
  • Connectors on personal fall arrest systems are covered with a corrosion-resistant finish. All surfaces and edges are smooth to prevent damage to interfacing parts of the system
  • Dee-rings and snaphooks on personal fall arrest systems do have a minimum tensile strength of 5,000 pounds
  • Dee-rings and snaphooks on personal fall arrest systems have been proof tested to a minimum tensile load of 3,600 pounds without cracking, breaking, or becoming deformed
  • Locking snaphooks do prevent disengagement of the snaphook if the connected member contacts the snaphook keeper
  • Locking snaphooks are prohibited for the following types of connections (unless designed for that purpose): a. directly to webbing, rope, or wire rope b. to each other c. to a dee-ring to which another snaphook or other connector is attached d. to a horizontal lifeline e. to any object that is incompatible with the snaphook such that unintentional disengagement could occur
  • Horizontal lifelines are designed, installed, and used (under the supervision of a qualified person) as part of a complete personal fall arrest system that maintains a safety factor of at least two
  • Lanyards and vertical lifelines do have a minimum breaking strength of 5,000 pounds
  • When vertical lifelines are used, each person is attached to a separate lifeline
  • Lifelines are protected against being cut or abraded
  • Self retracting lifelines and lanyards that automatically limit free-fall distance to 2 feet or less sustain a tensile can load of at least 3,000 pounds (applied to the device with the lifeline or lanyard fully extended)
  • The following equipment can sustain a tensile load of at least 5,000 pounds applied to the device with the lifeline or lanyard fully extended: a. self-retracting lifelines and lanyards that do not limit free-fall distance to 2 feet or less b. ripstitch lanyards c. tearing and deforming lanyards
  • Only ropes and straps (webbing) are made of synthetic fibers used in lanyards, lifelines, and strength components of body belts and body harnesses
  • Anchorages are used to attach personal fall arrest equipment separate from any anchorage used to support or suspend platforms. They can support at least 5,000 pounds per person attached
  • When stopping a fall, personal fall arrest systems do limit the maximum arresting force on a person to 1,800 pounds when used with a body harness
  • When stopping a fall, personal fall arrest systems are rigged such that a person can neither free fall more than 6 feet, nor contact any lower level
  • When stopping a fall, personal fall arrest systems do bring a person to a complete stop and limit maximum deceleration distance to 3.5 feet
  • When stopping a fall, personal fall arrest systems can withstand twice the potential impact energy of a person free falling a distance of 6 feet, or the free fall distance permitted by the system (whichever is less)
  • The attachment point of the body harness is located in the center of the wearer’s back near shoulder level, or above the wearer’s head
  • Body harnesses and components are used only for personal protection (as part of a personal fall arrest systems) and not to hoist materials
  • Personal fall arrest systems and components that are subjected to impact loading are immediately removed from service and not used again for protection until inspected by a competent person and determined to be undamaged and suitable for reuse
  • Provisions are made for prompt rescue in the event of a fall, or are employees able to rescue themselves
  • Personal fall arrest systems are inspected before each use for wear and damage. Defective components are removed from service
  • Attaching personal fall arrest systems to guardrail systems or hoists is prohibited
  • When a personal fall arrest system is used at hoist areas, it is rigged to allow the movement of the person only as far as the edge of the walking or working surface

Warning Line Systems

  • A warning line is erected around all sides of the roof work area
  • When mechanical equipment is not used, the warning line is erected 6 feet or more from the roof edge
  • When mechanical equipment is used, the warning line is erected 6 feet or more from the roof edge that is parallel to the direction of mechanical equipment operation, and 10 feet or more from the roof edge that is perpendicular to the direction of mechanical equipment operation
  • Points of access, materials handling areas, storage areas, and hoisting areas are connected to the work area by an access path formed by two warning lines
  • When the path to a point of access is not in use, a rope, wire, chain, or other barricade (equivalent in strength and height to the warning line) is placed across the path, or is the path offset such that a person cannot walk directly into the work area
  • Warning lines do consist of supporting stanchions and ropes, wires, or chains
  • The rope, wire, or chain flagged is at 6-foot intervals (or less) with high-visibility material
  • The rope, wire, or chain is rigged and supported so that its lowest point (including sag) is 34 inches or more from the walking or working surface, and its highest point is 39 inches or less from the walking or working surface
  • After being erected (with the rope, wire, or chain attached), stanchions can resist (without tipping over) a force that is a. at least 16 pounds applied horizontally against the stanchion, b. 30 inches above the walking or working surface, c. perpendicular to the warning line, and d. in the direction of the floor, roof, or platform edge
  • The rope, wire, or chain does have a minimum tensile strength of 500 pounds. After being attached to the stanchions, it can support (without breaking) the loads applied to the stanchions
  • The line is attached at each stanchion so that pulling on one section of the line between stanchions will not result in slack being taken up in adjacent sections before the stanchion tips over
  • Employees and students are prohibited from entering the area between a roof edge and a warning line unless he or she is performing roofing work in that area
  • Mechanical equipment on roofs is used or stored only in areas where employees and students are protected by a warning line system, guardrail system, or personal fall arrest system